Cooperative Extension, Sutter-Yuba Counties
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Cooperative Extension, Sutter-Yuba Counties

Posts Tagged: Robbin Thorp

Bumble Bee Braking During a Winter Break

A queen yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, brakes during a winter break in Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You never know what you'll find when you visit a pollinator garden. Take the case of our visit Nov. 12 to the Sonoma Cornerstone, Sonoma, to see the pollinator garden of Kate Frey, an ardent pollinator advocate, world-class garden designer, and...

Posted on Friday, December 1, 2017 at 3:57 PM

A Bee Is a Bee Is a Bee...

One's a fly and one's a bee. Can you tell them apart? Honey bee on the left: syrphid fly on the right. They're nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Remember that line in Gertrude Stein's 1913 poem, Sacred Emily: "A rose is a rose is a rose"? Well, to paraphrase Stein: "A bee is a bee is a bee...except when it's not a bee." In a recent interactive feature in the New York Times, writer Joanna Klein...

Posted on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 5:00 PM

A Reason Why Bumble Bee Population Is Declining

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on Salvia 'Indigo Spires' in Kate Frey's pollinator garden at the Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The news is disturbing but not unexpected. Scientists are linking global climate change to one reason why the worldwide population of bumble bees is declining. An article published Sept. 28 in the journal Ecology Letters by Florida State University...

Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 at 3:05 PM

Bee-ing All You Can Be and See and Do

A native bee, Anthophora urbana, buzzes over a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a weekend for bee and gardening enthusiasts! It's a shame we all can't clone ourselves and be in two places at the same time! The 40th annual Western Apicultural Society conference at the University of California, Davis, just concluded and now...

Posted on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 4:48 PM

The Sneaky Cuckoo Bee

A cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, sips nectar from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You could call it a slacker, a deadbeat, a moocher, a sponger, or a loafer. Or you could call it a cuckoo bee. Take the cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, a parasite of the digger bee, Anthophora. When the female Anthophora leaves its nest to...

Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2017 at 2:07 PM

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