Cooperative Extension, Sutter-Yuba Counties
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Cooperative Extension, Sutter-Yuba Counties

Posts Tagged: Robbin Thorp

Sold on the Salvia

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the

Ever watched Valley carpenter bees (Xylocopa varipuncta) foraging on salvia? Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis, recently noticed a flurry of carpenter bees in the...

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the
A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the "pollen cap." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, forages on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. Note the "pollen cap." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the
Check out the "pollen cap" on this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, foraging on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the "pollen cap" on this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, foraging on grape-scented sage, Salvia melissodora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2015 at 9:18 PM

How Many Bumble Bees Have You Seen This Year?

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Quick! How many bumble bees have you seen so far this year? For me, it's zero, zilch, nada. They're out there, though. Talent insect photographer Allan Jones of Davis, shared some of his images that he captured this year. Bumble bees, however, are...

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus fervidus (formerly Bombus californicus) on a coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus fervidus (formerly Bombus californicus) on a coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus fervidus (formerly Bombus californicus) on a coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the Western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis, which is declining rapidly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the Western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis, which is declining rapidly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the Western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis, which is declining rapidly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, with a load of red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, with a load of red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, with a load of red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 6:18 PM

Loving the Lupine

A honey bee heads for lupine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a given: Honey bees love lupine. We watched them buzzing around a flower patch of blue (lupine) and gold (California poppies) today along Hopkins Road, University of California, Davis, west of the central campus. Those are Aggie colors: blue and...

A honey bee heads for lupine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads for lupine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads for lupine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee with a huge pollen load. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee with a huge pollen load. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee with a huge pollen load. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Saddlebags? No, a heavy load of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Saddlebags? No, a heavy load of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Saddlebags? No, a heavy load of pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 9, 2015 at 5:54 PM

Two Who Make a Difference

Emcee Bill Rains (left) congratulations Robbin Thorp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They are two who make a difference. Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology, received the 2015 Distinguished Emeritus Award and Hugh Dingle, emeritus professor of entomology, received an Edward A. Dickson Emeritus...

Emcee Bill Rains (left) congratulations Robbin Thorp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Emcee Bill Rains (left) congratulations Robbin Thorp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Emcee Bill Rains (left) congratulations Robbin Thorp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

From left are Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph Hexter; emcee Bill Rains; Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor; and Chancellor Linda P. B. Katehi. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
From left are Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph Hexter; emcee Bill Rains; Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor; and Chancellor Linda P. B. Katehi. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

From left are Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph Hexter; emcee Bill Rains; Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor; and Chancellor Linda P. B. Katehi. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hugh Dingle (standing right) and Daniel Anderson (standing left), two of the Dickson recipients, receive the applause of the crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hugh Dingle (standing right) and Daniel Anderson (standing left), two of the Dickson recipients, receive the applause of the crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hugh Dingle (standing right) and Daniel Anderson (standing left), two of the Dickson recipients, receive the applause of the crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at 9:14 PM

Visit from Down Under

Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a good visit from "Down Under."  Australian beekeeper/pollination specialist Trevor Monson, a second-generation beekeeper, and his son, Jonathan and nephew Reece spent several hours last week at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research...

Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Apiarist/pollination specialist Trevor Monson (left) talks bees with pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trevor Monson (second from left) and nephew Reece and son Jonathan chat with native pollination specialist Robbin Thorp (far right), distinguished emeritus professor of entomology. They are looking at a Valley carpenter bee nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Trevor Monson (second from left) and nephew Reece and son Jonathan chat with native pollination specialist Robbin Thorp (far right), distinguished emeritus professor of entomology. They are looking at a Valley carpenter bee nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trevor Monson (second from left) and nephew Reece and son Jonathan chat with native pollination specialist Robbin Thorp (far right), distinguished emeritus professor of entomology. They are looking at a Valley carpenter bee nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Australian trio and two UC Davis scientists are in front of
The Australian trio and two UC Davis scientists are in front of "Miss Bee Haven," the ceramic mosaic sculpture in the UC Davis honey bee garden. From left are Trevor's nephew, Reece; UC Davis native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis; Trevor Monson and his son, Jonathan, and in back, pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Australian trio and two UC Davis scientists are in front of "Miss Bee Haven," the ceramic mosaic sculpture in the UC Davis honey bee garden. From left are Trevor's nephew, Reece; UC Davis native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis; Trevor Monson and his son, Jonathan, and in back, pollination ecologist Neal Williams, associate professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 6, 2015 at 6:12 PM

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