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What, Santa Didn't Bring You a Tarantula for Christmas?

Mexican redknee tarantula, the new project of 9-year-old Delsin Russell of Vacaville. Santa delivered the much-wanted gift on Christmas Eve. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doesn't Santa give everyone a Mexican redknee tarantula for Christmas? Oh, you didn't get yours? Well, Delsin Russell, 9, of Vacaville, did, and he and his mother journeyed Saturday, Jan. 12 to the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on the University of California, Davis, campus, to show it to scientists and perhaps get it sexed. Male or female? That's still uncertain. Russell, wearing a purple t-shirt lettered with "Easily Distracted by Bugs," said Santa knew what he wanted and...

Mexican redknee tarantula, the new project of 9-year-old Delsin Russell of Vacaville. Santa delivered the much-wanted gift on Christmas Eve. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mexican redknee tarantula, the new project of 9-year-old Delsin Russell of Vacaville. Santa delivered the much-wanted gift on Christmas Eve. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican redknee tarantula, the new project of 9-year-old Delsin Russell of Vacaville. Santa delivered the much-wanted gift on Christmas Eve. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Delsin Russell of Vacaville, then  8, attended an open house last August at the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his mother, Beth. Here they chat with Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Delsin Russell of Vacaville, then 8, attended an open house last August at the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his mother, Beth. Here they chat with Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Delsin Russell of Vacaville, then 8, attended an open house last August at the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his mother, Beth. Here they chat with Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 4:56 PM

Kira Meets a Stick Insect

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters isn't sure she wants meet an Australian stick insect at the Bohart Museum. She is holding mom's hand. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you're five years old and just learning about the world around you and its inhabitants, it's okay to be a little apprehensive when you encounter a giant prickly stick insect with thornlike spikes. Even if your mother is holding it. Such was the case when Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology last Saturday with her mother, Kendra Olmos, executive director of the Center for Water-Energy Efficiency, UC Davis Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The...

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters isn't sure she wants meet an Australian stick insect at the Bohart Museum. She is holding mom's hand. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters isn't sure she wants meet an Australian stick insect at the Bohart Museum. She is holding mom's hand. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos, 5, of Winters isn't sure she wants meet an Australian stick insect at the Bohart Museum. She is holding mom's hand. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos' reaction is priceless as she reacts to the stick insect on her mother's arm.
Kira Olmos' reaction is priceless as she reacts to the stick insect on her mother's arm. "She’s really not sure she wants to be one the same planet as that stick insect," commented Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos' reaction is priceless as she reacts to the stick insect on her mother's arm. "She’s really not sure she wants to be one the same planet as that stick insect," commented Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos leans forward for a closer look at the Australian stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Kira Olmos leans forward for a closer look at the Australian stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos leans forward for a closer look at the Australian stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos smiles as she holds a smaller stick insect at the Bohart Museum. In back are UC Davis student fly researchers Yao Cai, graduate student, and Cindy Truong, undergraduate student, of the Joanna Chiu lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Kira Olmos smiles as she holds a smaller stick insect at the Bohart Museum. In back are UC Davis student fly researchers Yao Cai, graduate student, and Cindy Truong, undergraduate student, of the Joanna Chiu lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kira Olmos smiles as she holds a smaller stick insect at the Bohart Museum. In back are UC Davis student fly researchers Yao Cai, graduate student, and Cindy Truong, undergraduate student, of the Joanna Chiu lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at 5:10 PM

Bruce Hammock: From Researching Insects to Helping Humankind

An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And to think it all began with butterflies. From basic science to applied science. From studying insects to helping humankind. The ovarian cancer research published today in the Proceedings for the National Academy of Science (PNAS) can be traced back, in part, to a former graduate student at UC Berkeley trying to answer some basic questions on how a caterpillar becomes a butterfly. Metamorphosis. In investigating those basic questions, that graduate student, Bruce Hammock, and fellow...

An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail,Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An anise swallowtail,Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail,Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 14, 2019 at 5:00 PM

Don't Miss This: Maggot Art at the Bohart

This maggot art is the work of entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, professor of entomology at UC Davis and former chair of the department. She served as the co-founding director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Maggot art at the Bohart! That rhymes. And that's what's planned as the family craft activity when the Bohart Museum of Entomology hosts an open house on fly research from 1 to 4 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 12 in Room 1124 of the Academic Surge Building, located on Crocker Lane, UC Davis campus. It's free and family friendly. Bohart associate and entomology undergraduate student Wade Spencer has ordered the maggots. The tables are set up and ready. All you do is pick up a maggot, dip it into a...

This maggot art is the work of entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, professor of entomology at UC Davis and former chair of the department. She served as the co-founding director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This maggot art is the work of entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, professor of entomology at UC Davis and former chair of the department. She served as the co-founding director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This maggot art is the work of entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, professor of entomology at UC Davis and former chair of the department. She served as the co-founding director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Department of Entomology and Nematology offers maggot art at Briggs Hall during the annual UC Davis Picnic Day. This year's Picnic Day is set April 13. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The UC Department of Entomology and Nematology offers maggot art at Briggs Hall during the annual UC Davis Picnic Day. This year's Picnic Day is set April 13. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Department of Entomology and Nematology offers maggot art at Briggs Hall during the annual UC Davis Picnic Day. This year's Picnic Day is set April 13. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 11, 2019 at 5:00 PM

Firewise – Fire Resistant Landscaping

Defensible Space, Zone 1-Home defense zone, Zone 2-Reduced fuel zone from Cal Fire

By Brent McGhie, UC Master Gardener of Butte County, January 11, 2019 Fire is a normal part of the natural environment in California, so if you live in the wildland-urban interface (WUI), it's not so much a question of if, but of when your home will be exposed to wildfire. With this thought and the devastation of the Camp Fire fresh in mind, many Butte County property owners may be thinking about creating a fire-resistant landscape around their homes. Not only is this a prudent course of...

Posted on Friday, January 11, 2019 at 5:00 AM

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